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Living in Ireland

Have you lived or are living in Ireland or maybe thinking about it. This is the place to exchange thoughts, information, experiences or humour. Go On, Go On, Go On, Go on, You Will, You Will, You Will!

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Signs That You Have Been In Ireland Too Long!

SIGNS YOU HAVE BEEN IN CORK TOO LONG

1. You say "I'm Grand, like" all the time.

2. You think Murphy's is 'savage'.

3. You think of Murphy's as if it is the sixth food group.

4. You say "Are you Grand?" all the time.

5. You say "Tis grand, like?" all the time.

6. You say "That'd be grand, like" all the time.

7. You take 4 hours to get home on a Saturday night and think nothing of it.

8. You don't eat anything cold, uncooked or not resembling meat, bread or potatoes.

9. You say "Your man" followed by 'boiy' all the time.

10. You say "Your woman" followed by 'boiy' all the time.

11. You say "Tis grand that your man asked if i'm grand, like, boiy" all the time.

12. You find yourself still living with family and having dinners cooked for you by someone's mammy.

13. You talk about 'dinners' and 'mammys'.

SIGNS YOU'VE BEEN IN DUBLIN TOO LONG

1. You say 'towen' when you mean the city.

2. You think it is perfectly normal to pay over 4 euro for a pint.

3. Anyone not from Dublin is a 'Muck Savage'.

4. You have no idea where Ballydehob is.

5. You see a member of Westlife on Grafton Street and find it hard to get excited about it.

6. The countryside makes you nervous.

7. Somebody speaks to you on the DART and you freak out thinking they are a stalker.

8. Tourists no longer annoy you.

9. You can't remember the last time you got up to 30mph in your car in 'towen'.

SIGNS YOU'VE BEEN IN LIMERICK TOO LONG

1. You have an uncontrollable urge to steal.

2. You keep going on about how great Limerick and Garryowen are.

3. To you, organised crime is putting petrol in the getaway car.

4. You start to cry when you hear 'Beautiful Munster'.

5. You think anyone from Limerick has a great sense of humour.

6. You think everyone's heard of Barry Foley.

7. You think Dubliners are 'soft east coast ashey pets' ... until they kick your head in at rugby.

8. You deny that it rains all the time ... as you struggle home with the shopping in yet another torrential downpour.

SIGNS YOU'VE BEEN IN MONAGHAN TOO LONG

1. You say 'Sir' all the time("Howsa goan thur Sir").

2. You say 'shite' all the time.

3. You say 'aye' all the time.

4. You end sentences with 'Hiagh'.

5. You think McArdles Ale is great, ignoring the fact it 'tastes of sh1t'.

6. You get an urge to punch everybody you meet.

7. You punch everybody you meet.

8. You get drunk before, after and during punching everybody you meet.

9. You are incomprehensible when you speak while trying to punch everyone you meet.

10. People seem to be scared of you when you say where you are from.

11. You automatically get the urge to kill on hearing the words 'Monarchy' or 'England'.

SIGNS YOU'VE BEEN IN GALWAY TOO LONG

1. You say "Howsa' goin" all the time.

2. You can't remember a weekend when a friend from Dublin or Cork wasn’t sleeping on your couch.

3. When you meet someone on Tuesday afternoon you tell them you haven't been out in ages, then remember that you were chatting to that same person last night in the Quays.

4. You agree with all taxi drivers on all subjects - why bother getting thick.

5. Unless the taxi driver is from Mayo.

6. Unless, like half the population living in Galway, you're from Mayo.

7. When you say you live in Galway, people immediately smile and tell you about their wild weekend in Salthill when they were 16. You nod enthusiastically about the same venue, despite the fact that you were never there.

8. You think that it's perfectly normal to have six buskers (including an Ethiopian bagpipe player), eight street entertainers, 19 Romanian beggars, a krusty holding some bailing twine tied to a raggedy dog telling fortunes and four separate roadwork’s all on the one street.

SIGNS YOU'VE BEEN IN WICKLOW TOO LONG

1. You're still there.

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Comment by Kimberly Sullivan on December 27, 2013 at 16:55
  • My sis and I are visiting in August, I have looked at the groups listed but can't find what we are looking for. She will be staying a month but I will only stay 2 weeks. We are looking to stay a week at each bed & breakfast. Any suggestions? Would like to do some of the tourist things.

  • But mostly would like the local experience!

  • Thank you for your time, Kim

Comment by Brian Casey on May 15, 2013 at 17:08

I'm moving to Ireland in September. I, my wife, and nine-year-old son will be staying in Castlebar for the duation of our 90-day tourist visa. No need to find employment as we both do freelance work online, so our jobs travel with us.

We've friends in Westport that will help us see about getting our visa extended so we can stay longer. We absolutely love Ireland and 90 days simply isn't enough time in this gorgeous country with its wonderful people and its amazing history!

Comment by William Strech on March 24, 2012 at 21:52

I have visited Ireland four times, and I have wanted to move there since my first visit.  It may be two years before I can retire and make it permanent, but I will visit again before then.  

Bill

Comment by Mary Beasley on September 17, 2011 at 23:59

Link to the article below - 2010

Ireland : Job market

What are my chances of getting a job?

Like most countries Ireland has been affected by the global financial crisis of 2008-2010 and this has had an ongoing impact on the job market which remains somewhat depressed. Some of the hardest hit employment sectors are construction, wholesale and retail, industry and agriculture (Forfas, 2010).

Recent figures suggest that things are gradually beginning to improve, and records show that those who have attained a good educational level generally find it easier to secure employment.

Generally Irish employers remain positive about employing EU Nationals and foreign applicants where suitable vacancies exist, provided they speak fluent English.

  • Typical problems encountered: some professions require registration with the relevant professional associations and all the necessary qualifications and training to meet Irish standards and conditions (e.g. surgery, nursing, physiotherapy). There is intense competition from other graduates, particularly postgraduates.
  • How to improve your chances: undertake postgraduate study. In June 2006, the Irish Government announced a new Strategy for Science,Technology and Innovation 2006-2013 , which aims to double postgraduates with 1,000 PhDs every year by 2013 and a further 315 postgraduates in the humanities and social sciences. This investment of €8.2billion (£7.7billion) will open up five main economic areas for hugely enhanced research and development in agri-food, marine industries, energy, healthcare and the environment (Department of Enterprise, Trade and Innovation for Ireland (DETI)). Obtain practical work experience through a graduate internship or placement scheme. Build your skill set. You need to be able to demonstrate basic competencies such as good computer skills, numeracy, teamwork, communication skills. Offering fluency in another language might also help.
  • Language requirements: English and Irish (Gaeilge) are the official languages of Ireland. You will need to be fluent in English to work in Ireland. For some public service appointments, such as some teaching and lecturing posts, some knowledge of Irish is also required. Irish self-study courses are available through Eurotalk Interactive , Routledge Language Learning  and Gaeltalk Online at Learn4Good .

 Where can I work?

  • Major industries: high technology areas, particularly in the software industry, engineering, pharmaceuticals, medical technologies, transport, storage, communications, the public and social sector, electricity, gas and water.
  • Recent growth areas: engineering, IT, the internationally traded services sector, including financial services and e-business, utilities, public and social sector, chemicals, biometrics, waste management and the environmental sector.
  • Industries in decline: agriculture, construction, manufacturing and transportation.
  • Shortage occupations: engineering, financial services (particularly accountancy), IT, computing, medical, social care and science areas.
  • Major companies: Microsoft, IBM, Novell, GlaxoSmithKline, Integra LifeSciences, International Financial Services Centre, Daiwa Securities, Siemens, Procter & Gamble, Pfizer, Intel and Merrill Lynch.
  • Search for more companies: Kompass - a worldwide business directory searchable by country and product/service, Chambers of Commerce Ireland , and Irish Yellow Pages .
  • Major cities: Dublin (capital, largest), Cork, Galway and Mayo.

 What’s it like working in Ireland?

  • Average working hours: the average Irish working week is 39 hours. Working hours are governed by EU directives, which stipulate that you’re entitled to a minimum of 11hours continuous rest in every 24 hours and at least one rest period in a working day of more than six hours. You’re also entitled to at least 24 hours continuous rest every week.
  • Holidays: you are entitled to a minimum of four weeks holiday and the nine public holidays every year.
  • Average graduate starting salary: a number of sources indicate that €29,000 (£25,000) is the current salary average for graduates in Ireland. However, since this figure includes the salaries of the highest earning positions such as investment bankers and engineers, most graduate jobs will start on less than this.
  • Tax rates: all EU/EEA and Swiss nationals resident and working in Ireland will pay tax in the same way as Irish nationals. The two bands for personal income tax are 20% and 41%. (Revenue - Irish Tax and Customs).
  • Working practices and customs: business dress does not differ from the UK. Mr, Mrs or Ms should be used when greeting people. In conversation, the Irish tend to move on quickly to a first-name basis. It is appropriate to present a business card at introductions. Before a meeting, there is usually preliminary small talk, to establish rapport. Networking over coffee is a popular way to do business.
 

What are the next steps?

 
 
AGCAS
Written by AGCAS editors
Date: 
June 2010
Comment by eiresonia on December 8, 2009 at 0:25
umm,im hear,new ross?at Wexford....ohhh well,sure u re great there,and yes all from gallway ,kerry at cork,all west it is irrresistable!!im back,visit the family my kids and care the grandma,well my mother in law,after 8 years ,is painfull be away even for only months,but well,these time im not enjoy trips,well,wasent the time,and anyway 8 years its plenty time even for discover places like paradise.but Ella ,here the point,on her sikness,told now plenty about her trips,and family over US.and well i ned only said than its more than only migration trips,its a a line of blod that long that even with the distance its imposible broke,for plenty time irish make another part of the country,another irish county,and its imposible ask how they back with roots,without thinking how irish was there with roots,time ago,now,here or there u find sure american ascendent irishlike irish ascendent amarican,and in plenty years my mother in law remember now all her blod leagues.well,thats all,i hope she get all love deserve now,like alls great irish,plenty love,take care,and any coming for trips tourims or bak for xmas,enjoy lots,these amazing land and people,will allways on hear making gourgeuss time.enjoy,XXX
Comment by Diehard Divah on November 12, 2009 at 20:47
SWEET JAYSUS THIS PLACE IS FIERCE FECKIN' FUNNY, SO IT IS, (caps are cos i"m roarin") HOW ARE YE LADS... I'M LIVIN' IN POLAND AT BUT THIS SITE HAD INSPIRED ME TO COME HAME FOR A VISIT NEXT BLOODY WEEK, SO IT HAS. I'M A DUB, LIVING IN NEWROSS, NOW POLAND SO TH'OUL ACCENT'S A BIT OF A MIX.. HA,HA.. JESUS THANKS FOR LETTIN' ME JOIN , TIS FIERCE KIND OF YE, GOD BLESS YA ALL, YOU'RE BLOOD'S WORTH BOTTLIN' SO IT IS! ;-)
Comment by Anne Mc Loone on October 30, 2009 at 20:21
Diana, just from a personal point of view I could not understand why anyone with Irish roots would doubt their welcome to live here! Even without roots! There is a big surplus of houses nationwide and prices are dropping steadily. People got a bit carried away for a few years with living beyond their means, delusions of grandeur and self-importance but there is a turning back to simpler lifestyles, Church and health concerns. Good luck!
Comment by Diana Boster on October 29, 2009 at 2:25
How do people in Ireland feel about Americans coming to live in Ireland back to their roots?
Comment by Greg Neuhaus on September 9, 2009 at 21:11
My family has been there but I have not. Of all the people NOT to go, why me?! The family is in County Tuam but I'd like to roam the country some day soon. When my Aunt & Uncle were over there, they rented one car ... and wrecked it twice on the narrow roads.
Comment by joe bacon on August 21, 2009 at 23:34
Hi Mara. I spent July 3 to 21st in Doolin. It's a greta little spot and is central to so much. Galway is about an hour and a half away. The Cliff of Moher are right next to Doolin. The Dingle Penn. and Ring of Kerry all within visiting distance. Shannon Airport is about an hour away. The people are incredible. I hope you have as good a trip as I did!!!
 

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